Book & Product Reviews

The Power of Now

The Power of Now

I have listened to the audio book The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle a number of times but this is the first time I’ve written anything about it. The premise of the book as you might expect is the value of living in the present moment, in the now. The audio book is over seven and half hours long, with the hardcover version of the book containing 208 pages. I really enjoyed this book probably because I tend to get lost in thoughts of the future, which frankly have me missing the great things that I am should be experiencing in the present moment. 

Maybe you don’t have this problem but instead you are thinking about what happened yesterday or a decade ago, spending most of your time living in the past. In either case whether you spend your time living in the future or the past we are missing out on the serenity available living in the present moment. Sounds easy, but take the time to notice what you normally think about and you will notice that your thoughts are often centered around what I have to do later, tomorrow, or next week. In The Power of Now, Eckhart Tolle makes a compelling case for living in the present moment, the only real moment you have. 

I love listening to or reading books by Eckhart Tolle as they help ground me and remind me to live in the present, where I can focus and enjoy life more fully. If I am feeling like I am living too much in the future I listen to The Power of Now or A New Earth Awakening. I highly recommend this book and would love to know what you think, so don’t feel bashful about leaving a comment.

Below is a pretty good introduction into Eckhart Tolle’s philosophy.

 

A bit about the author from Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eckhart_Tolle

Eckhart Tolle (born Ulrich Leonard Tölle, February 16, 1948) is a spiritual teacher. He is a German-born resident of Canada best known as the author of The Power of Now and A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose. In 2008, The New York Times called Tolle “the most popular spiritual author in the United States”. In 2011, he was listed by Watkins Review as the most spiritually influential person in the world. Tolle is not identified with any particular religion, but he has been influenced by a wide range of spiritual works.

Tolle said he was depressed for much of his life until age 29, when he underwent an “inner transformation”. He then spent several years wandering “in a state of deep bliss” before becoming a spiritual teacher. He moved to Vancouver, British Columbia in 1995 and currently divides his time between Canada and California. He began writing his first book, The Power of Now, in 1997 and it reached The New York Times Best Seller list in 2000.

The Power of Now and A New Earth sold an estimated three million and five million copies respectively in North America by 2009. In 2008, approximately 35 million people participated in a series of 10 live webinars with Tolle and television talk show host Oprah Winfrey. In 2016, Tolle was named in Oprah’s SuperSoul 100 list of visionaries and influential leaders.

Namaste

 

 

 

 

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Book & Product Reviews

Crime and Punishment

crime and punishment

I just finished listening to the audio book Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. This part of the my own personal discovery of Russian novelists. I have been reading The Gulag Achipelago by Solzhenitsyn, enjoying it very much so I thought I would check out one of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s famous novels. Written in installments in 1886 the book centers around a central character Rodion Raskolnikov sometimes just referred to as Raskolnikov in the book. Raskolnikov is a student living in Saint Petersburg, who falls upon hard times and commits a capital crime. I won’t spoil it for you by going into a lot of details, but let’s just say it is pretty unexpected.

I just wanted to state that I don’t write book reviews that summarize the story line, which would frankly just ruin it for you should you decide to read or listen to the book. My purpose for writing these reviews is more about offering up an opinion of whether the book is worth reading and how it made me feel.

If you have ever read anything from Dostoevsky or Solzhenitsyn you have a pretty good idea of what Russia was like late 1800’s through mid 1900’s. This book provides a wonderful depiction of the plight of the people during that time period and the pathetic living conditions the Russian people experienced. This book is not one of those uplifting novels that I normally write about; instead it is all pretty morbid. If I could sum up the book in a couple of sentences it would be something like this:

An in-depth character study of what desperate people are willing to do to each other. Secondly the price one pays for their indiscretions in terms of guilt and self loathing. 

Recommendation:

Fyodor Dostoevsky is a talented writer and I would read other books that he has written, but I kind of like this kind of morbid stuff. This is a very long book, with the audio book being over 21 hours, so be prepared to invest some serious time reading or listening to this book. There are chapters that kind of drag on and on, so you need to be willing to deal with that as the author delves deeper into the characters and their relationship to each other. I’m a bit torn about recommending this unless you have read something like the Gulag Archipelago and enjoyed it. The author is a fascinating character and you will see portions of his own life reflected in his writing.

A little bit about Dostoevsky from Wikipedia:

Born in Moscow in 1821, Dostoevsky was introduced to literature at an early age through fairy tales and legends, and through books by Russian and foreign authors. His mother died in 1837 when he was 15, and around the same time, he left school to enter the Nikolayev Military Engineering Institute. After graduating, he worked as an engineer and briefly enjoyed a lavish lifestyle, translating books to earn extra money. In the mid-1840s he wrote his first novel, Poor Folk, which gained him entry into St. Petersburg’s literary circles. Arrested in 1849 for belonging to a literary group that discussed banned books critical of “Tsarist Russia”, he was sentenced to death but the sentence was commuted at the last moment. He spent four years in a Siberian prison camp, followed by six years of compulsory military service in exile. In the following years, Dostoevsky worked as a journalist, publishing and editing several magazines of his own and later A Writer’s Diary, a collection of his writings. He began to travel around western Europe and developed a gambling addiction, which led to financial hardship. For a time, he had to beg for money, but he eventually became one of the most widely read and highly regarded Russian writers.

Namaste